“Baby, don’t you want to dance for me?”

posted in: Georgetown, WMATA | 5
“I always think of the bus driver as the person who might actually prevent someone from saying something like that. Instead, it was the person who was supposed to keep an eye out for that who was harrassing me.” Photo credit: Cary Grant

Location: Bus stop 38B; M & 33rd St
Time: Night (7:30pm-12am)

I had met some friends for a drink in Georgetown and was waiting for the bus, thinking that that was safer than walking over to Rosslyn to catch the metro. I was a bit wary of late night bus riding, but figured it was a short trip. After I swiped my metro card, the bus driver said “Baby, don’t you want to dance for me?” I was very clearly not drunk. Maybe he expected me to be. Either way, I always think of the bus driver as the person who might actually prevent someone from saying something like that. Instead, it was the person who was supposed to keep an eye out for that who was harrassing me

Submitted on 7/13/12 by Anonymous

If you experience or have experienced sexual harassment on the DC Metro system:
Please consider reporting to Metro Transit Police; www.wmata.com/harassment, on Twitter at @WMATAharassment, or 202-962-2121.

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Clueless.

I went to the Rosslyn Movie Festival yesterday at Gateway Park, where every Friday from yesterday to the first week of September they’re going to show movies from the 90’s. I get there and this weird guy would not stop staring at me. He sat there with this blank expression on his face, cigarette dangling out of his mouth, and just stared at me.

I knew it wasn’t random because I left my blanket to line up for the bean bag toss contest before the movie started, and when I went back I had to walk behind this guy. He swivels around to continue staring at me. My first reaction was to be passive. I used my bag to cover up my face when I walked by him at first, then thought “I’m not passive. I need to say something!”

I walked back up to him, with him still staring and told him “Dude, stop staring at me! It’s ANNOYING!” He somewhat stopped, though I glanced out the corner of my eye and found him staring again, yet turning his head when he knew I saw him doing it again. When his friends came he finally left me alone.

I was in a fun and festive mood when I got to the event, but this weirdo’s behavior ruined it. Only when the movie started was I able to relax again.

Then I left the event feeling fine, but during my walk home I walked past some creep waiting for the bus who said “Hey, baby” to me. Ew!

“I’m not your baby!” I responded, but he didn’t care because the bus came right away and he got away with it.

Why do men do this to women? It angers me.

Submitted by Anonymous on 5/1/2010

Location: 1st incident: Gateway Park (Rosslyn); 2nd incident: Wilson Blvd.
Do you have a personal experience with gender-based public sexual harassment or assault you would like to submit? Just click here and fill out the online submission form. All submissions are posted anonymously unless you specify.

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