Street Harassed in Chinatown: “We weren’t going to let these terrible people ruin our night!”

Street Harassed in Chinatown: "We weren't going to let these terrible people ruin our night."
Street Harassed in Chinatown: “We weren’t going to let these terrible people ruin our night.”

Location: H & 6th St NW (Chinatown)
Time: Late Night (12am-5am)

As my 3 friends and I walked three blocks to a Chinese restaurant coming from a club, we were continually street harassed. Almost every group of men we walked past called out at us or whistled. They said things like “are you guys hos in the making?” and asked “how much?” or just asked us if we were prostitutes.

Though we were drunk and laughed off the remarks at the time, they did make us feel a little less safe being around the area. We weren’t going to let these terrible people ruin our girls night, but wanted to share our story because we’re sure many other girls have had similar experiences and it isn’t fair.

Emphases by CASS.
Submitted 10/19/13 by “LG, NB, SM, EW.”


Do you have a personal experience with gender-based public sexual harassment or assault? Submit your story to help raise awareness about the pervasiveness and harmful effects of street harassment. All submissions are posted anonymously unless otherwise specified.

If you experience or have experienced sexual harassment on the DC Metro system: Whether the event is happening at the moment or occurred months ago, we strongly encourage you to report to Metro Transit Police (MTP): www.wmata.com/harassment or 202-962-2121. Reporting helps identify suspects as well as commons trends in harassment. Recommended tip: Program MTP’s number into your phone so you can easily reach them when needed. If you need assistance in coping with public sexual harassment or assault, please contact the DC Rape Crisis Center (DCRCC) 24/7 crisis hotline at 202-333-RAPE (202-333-7279).

“Girls should not be made to feel uncomfortable when they’re just trying to get home.”

Location: Gallery Place/Chinatown Metro
Time: Night (7:30pm-12am)

Image via ConsentED.

Coming back from a concert, my boyfriend and I were waiting on the platform of the Gallery Place/Chinatown stop, waiting for the redline towards Glenmont. Because of single tracking, everyone waiting for the redline was on one platform. We were standing right at the corner, or intersection of the escalators (kind of hard to describe, but basically we were not very far down the platform). Two guys were standing on the upper level (the platform for people to get from one side of the track from the other) which I didn’t think much of, but thinking back now, there was no reason for them to be up there other than to watch over the crowd. One was older (40’s) with messy gray hair in a black tank top, the other slightly younger, maybe 20’s, in glasses and a nats jersey.

A couple minutes after noticing them, the older one walked over so that he was directly above us on the platform, and called down “hey!” When I looked up, he asked “where’d he get those shorts?” Referring to my boyfriend. My boyfriend answered him with a store and the guy said “thanks…I like them” then walked away. A little random, maybe he was drunk, but we just shrugged off.

For the next few minutes, I kept noticing out of the corner of my eye the two of them staring at us. The same guy came over and said “Hey love?” To which I stupidly looked up, and then asked me for the time. I shook my head no and he walked away. At this point I was uncomfortable and my bf was annoyed so we moved further down the platform. The train came and we didn’t see them again.

Yes this was technically a “harmless” incident. But my boyfriend and I were holding hands, laughing, and I did not appreciate some scraggly old guy calling me “love”. Girls should not be made to feel uncomfortable when they’re just trying to get home. I almost felt like he was harassing me BECAUSE I was with my boyfriend and he wanted to provoke him. Whatever. I hate creeps.

Emphases by CASS.
Submitted 7/21/13 by Anonymous.


Do you have a personal experience with gender-based public sexual harassment or assault? Submit your story to help raise awareness about the pervasiveness and harmful effects of street harassment. All submissions are posted anonymously unless otherwise specified.

If you experience or have experienced sexual harassment on the DC Metro system: Whether the event is happening at the moment or occurred months ago, we strongly encourage you to report to Metro Transit Police (MTP): www.wmata.com/harassment or 202-962-2121. Reporting helps identify suspects as well as commons trends in harassment. Recommended tip: Program MTP’s number into your phone so you can easily reach them when needed.

If you need assistance in coping with public sexual harassment or assault, please contact the DC Rape Crisis Center (DCRCC) 24/7 crisis hotline at 202-333-RAPE (202-333-7279).

“I Was Sexually Assaulted at the Chinatown Metro Station”

Time:  Morning Rush Hour (5am-9:30am)
Location: Chinatown Metro Station

At 7am one Sunday morning, a friend and I were heading home dressed in our outfits from the night before (mini dresses and stillettos). The Chinatown metro station was fairly deserted. As we began going down the escalators we only saw one man behind us. As we got to the first landing, the man got very close to my friend and began trying to talk to her and feeling up her dress. She told him to stop and pushed him away from her then quickly got on the second set of escalators which were much longer. Just our luck, he followed us down. We were getting kind of nervous as there was absolutely no one to witness whatever was going to happen to us. Before I could even walk down a few steps to get away from him, he grabbed the edge of my dress and pulled it all the way up, exposing my thong. Thats when I started screaming as loud as I could (I didn’t know what else to do) he quickly ran up the escalators and we could see him looking down at us, smirking.

Looking back, I wish I called the police.

Emphases by CASS.
Submitted 6/28/13 by Anonymous.

I Was Sexually Assaulted at the Chinatown Metro Station
Escalators at DC’s Chinatown Metro Station

Editor’s Note: This time last year, we received a similar story of a reader being sexually assaulted on a DC metro escalator, this on at Union Station. In this case, the woman chased down the perpetrator until police came.


Do you have a personal experience with gender-based public sexual harassment or assault? Submit your story to help raise awareness about the pervasiveness and harmful effects of street harassment. All submissions are posted anonymously unless otherwise specified.

If you experience or have experienced sexual harassment on the DC Metro system: Whether the event is happening at the moment or occurred months ago, we strongly encourage you to report to Metro Transit Police (MTP): www.wmata.com/harassment or 202-962-2121. Reporting helps identify suspects as well as commons trends in harassment. Recommended tip: Program MTP’s number into your phone so you can easily reach them when needed.

If you need assistance in coping with public sexual harassment or assault, please contact the DC Rape Crisis Center (DCRCC) 24/7 crisis hotline at 202-333-RAPE (202-333-7279).

“I Was Forced to Take A Cab After Being Street Harassed & Followed in Chinatown.”

Location:  5th and Mass Avenue NW, DC
Time: Night (7:30pm-12am)

I was walking from my house to the Gallery Place Metro Station. I had to stop at the corner of 5th and Mass until the light changed. A teenager (probably between the ages of 16-18) asked me if I had a dollar. I usually dont give out money on the street, well not not to younger people who dont appear to be homeless. But I happened to have 4 quarters in my jacket pocket so I did. I was on my cell phone at the time (talking to my brother) and the guy starts telling me that I have a sexy voice and he noticed that I started to get nervous so he started to get closer to me and asked me “what is wrong with me and if I’m ok” hes completely violating my space and starts to follow me.

I asked him to leave me alone and that I wasnt interested. He still follows me on his bike asking me whats wrong with me. I stayed on the phone with my brother, to feel safer and I said to my brother I should get a cab instead of going any further to the train station. The guy rode his bike on another street by then…but as soon as I hailed the cab the guy on the bike rode up to the cab and basically chased me in there and I had to get in the door before he could try to open it, he was still saying things to me.

This was around 8:20 pm, it wasnt completely dark yet and there were plenty of people outside. The cab driver noticed that the guy chased me to the cab (while still on his bike). This should not be happening.

Read more stats via www.stopstreetharassment.org
Read more stats via Stop Street Harassment; www.stopstreetharassment.org

Emphases by CASS.
S
ubmitted 4/27/13 by Anonymous


Do you have a personal experience with gender-based public sexual harassment or assault?
Submit your story to help raise awareness about the pervasiveness and harmful effects of street harassment. All submissions are posted anonymously unless otherwise specified.

If you experience or have experienced sexual harassment on the DC Metro system:
Whether the event is happening at the moment or occurred months ago, we strongly encourage you to report to Metro Transit Police (MTP): www.wmata.com/harassment or 202-962-2121. Reporting helps identify suspects as well as commons trends in harassment. Recommended tip: Program MTP’s number into your phone so you can easily reach them when needed.

To The Woman Who Stood By Me As I Confronted Street Harassers: Thank You

“I’m so proud to be a part of a supportive community of women who have each others’ backs.”

Location: 7th Street, outside Verizon Center
Time: Daytime (9:30am-3:30pm)

I was walking back to the office from lunch today, enjoying the beautiful, sunny weather. I walked by a group of three men who were talking with one another on the street; as I was walking by, one of them made an inappropriate comment to me about my body.

At first I felt really uncomfortable and a little bit threatened, but I stopped and asked him why he thought he had the right to speak to me that way. We actually ended up having a fifteen-minute conversation (sometimes a fairly heated discussion, though it stayed polite) about why street harrassment makes women feel uncomfortable and why women don’t like having their bodies talked about by strangers. While I’m not sure I changed any minds, the men listened to what I had to say and said they’d think more about how their comments impacted people.

What I really want to add is a huge thank you to the woman who saw the beginning of my conversation and stopped and asked me if I needed backup, and then joined the discussion and stayed with me until the conversation ended. I really hope she reads this so that I can say thank you again – it makes me so, so happy that there are other women in DC who will stand up against street harassment  and who are willing to stop and help out other women when they’re faced with situations like this. I’m so proud to be a part of a supportive community of women who have each others’ backs.

Emphases by CASS.
Submitted 4/8/13 by “DA”


Do you have a personal experience with gender-based public sexual harassment or assault?
Submit your story to help raise awareness about the pervasiveness and harmful effects of street harassment. All submissions are posted anonymously unless otherwise specified.

If you experience or have experienced sexual harassment on the DC Metro system:
Whether the event is happening at the moment or occurred months ago, we strongly encourage you to report to Metro Transit Police (MTP): www.wmata.com/harassment or 202-962-2121. Reporting helps identify suspects as well as commons trends in harassment. Recommended tip: Program MTP’s number into your phone so you can easily reach them when needed.