My Streets, Too

CASS’s ongoing series of personal writings on street harassment by members of the DC community.

We want to hear your voice! If you would like to submit a piece for “My Streets, Too,” email us. You can submit using your full name, initials, or anonymously (just let us know). Please be sure to use the subject line “My Streets, Too.”


How I Learned the Danger of Being Friendly to Strangers
By Katie Bailey
Is it possible to be outgoing and friendly to strangers without making yourself a target for harassment?

 


How I Became An Anti-Street Harassment Activist
By Renee Davidson
CASS’s Communications Director shares how the street harassment she faced led to her to commit to anti-street harassment activism and work for CASS.

 



anti-street harassment street artThe Five Kinds of Street Harassers I Met In Washington D.C. This Weekend

By Danielle C. Belton
Recently I’ve moved back to Washington, D.C. Unfortunately, by choosing to walk around, freely in public as we are all wont to do, this weekend I had to deal with every sort of commentary that a woman can get on her body from strangers.


I Was Just Molested on the Train and I Didn’t Do Anything to Stop It.
By Jen Corey
It’s scary, complex and overwhelming to respond when you’re sexually assaulted on public transit — even when you thought you’d be prepared.

 


My Streets, My Body: How street harassment impacts my weight, my eating habits, my health
By “Dechanique”
Over the course of 2010-2011, I lost 100 pounds and had skin removal surgery. With every progressive step in my weight loss journey, the level of harassment I experienced continued to rise.

 


Follow-up: On the Reverse “10-5 Rule” and Walking While Female
By Liz Gorman
I was sexually assaulted in Dupont Circle last year and wrote about it after it happened. Since then, I’ve realized that in situations like mine, all you have is your voice.

 


On the WMATA Anti-Harassment Campaign: Are we any safer than we were?
By Allison Elder
A year after WMATA’s anti-harassment campaign launched, are we any safer than we were? Given the stories that are constantly emerging about harassment and feeling unsafe while taking public transportation, the answer is no.


Getting Off the Train
By Rosie Cohen
Growing up in Chevy Chase, DC, it was really exciting when I first started getting out into city. But even as a high schooler, street harassment taints everything: Getting off the train, walking down a busy street, walking the dog, biking home from school, crossing the street.


When in Rome
By Courtney Brooks
After moving to DC,  I learned how some men perceived the Metro as unspoken hyper-masculine “male space,” where their language, tone, word choice, and space dominate the geography of those train cars.

 


Feminism, The Bus Stop
By “AKD”
Street harassment affects women, regardless of their looks or socioeconomic status. It doesn’t matter how accomplished I am, or how I’m dressed, or how determined I look when I walk down the street.


When Standing Up to Sexual Harassment Makes You a B*tch
By Renee Davidson
A common dilemma for many women: Is it best for me to say nothing to street harassment and feel like a passive victim, or is it best to be assertive and then labeled a “bitch?”

 


It Feels Like This is How it’s Always Going to Be
By Nancy Messieh
After moving from Cairo to DC, I learned that walking while female in Egypt is the same as walking while female anywhere in the world – it means that, at any moment, you could find yourself on the receiving end of unwanted attention.


On the Reverse “10-5 Rule” and Walking While Female
By Liz Gorman
In July 2012, I was sexually assaulted by a serial sex offender who later became known as the “DC Bike groper.” This is my story.

 


We Want To Hear Your Voice.

If you would like to submit a piece for “My Streets, Too,” email us. You can submit using your full name, initials, or anonymously (just let us know).
Please be sure to use the subject line “My Streets, Too.”