Bouncer Steps in at Nellie’s.

Location: 9th & U in front of Nellie’s
Time: Late Night (12am-5am)

I was on 9th St NW and stopped in front of Nellie’s to call a car. A man exited Nellie’s and bumped into me, knocking me off my balance. I told him assertively not to touch me and he became angry, he yelled ‘don’t touch me’ back at me and walked a few feet away to his group of friends. I then heard him loudly comment to them that I “looked like a fucking dyke.” I responded that I was queer but it was a slur for him to address me that way. At that moment, a bouncer stepped in and told him that he needed to leave and never come back to Nellie’s. He denied the whole incident and she reiterated that she had witnessed it and that he needed to leave. I thanked her and then left as my car arrived.

I want to specifically shout out the awesome bouncer who did not hesitate to step in and stand up for me against harassment. She didn’t question my account or ask us both to leave, she called out his behavior and told him in no uncertain terms that it was not acceptable in that space. She definitely made me feel safer in a moment when I was upset.

Submitted 7/11/17 by “KS”

Do you have a personal experience with harassment or assault? Share your story to help raise awareness about the pervasiveness and harmful effects of street harassment. All submissions are posted anonymously unless otherwise specified.

If you experience or have experienced sexual harassment on the DC Metro system: Whether the event is happening at the moment or occurred months ago, we strongly encourage you to report to Metro Transit Police (MTP): www.wmata.com/harassment or 202-962-2121. Reporting helps identify suspects as well as commons trends in harassment. You can program MTP’s number into your phone so you can easily reach them when needed.

If you need assistance in coping with public sexual harassment or assault, please contact the DC Rape Crisis Center (DCRCC) 24/7 crisis hotline at 202-333-RAPE (202-333-7279).

He asked if I’m “from here” and demanded to see my ID.

Location: 7th and P, playground

Time: Evening Rush Hour (3:30pm-7:30pm)

I was walking into the park with my three-year-old, and I kneeled down to talk to him. A man stopped, put his hands on the gate, and stared at us. I looked back at him, and I asked him why he was staring at us. He asked me if I’m “from here” and demanded to see my ID. I was confused at first by what he even meant. I told him that I didn’t need to show him ID, and he insisted that I did. I told him that he was making me uncomfortable and that he should leave the park if he wasn’t with a child. We walked away, and he did, too. A man sitting on a bench asked us if we were OK. I stayed at the park for another hour after that, but I was shaken. I kept thinking he might come back with a weapon. I’m still so shaken and confused.

Submitted 6/1/17 by “JR”

Do you have a personal experience with gender-based public sexual harassment or assault? Share your story to help raise awareness about the pervasiveness and harmful effects of street harassment. All submissions are posted anonymously unless otherwise specified.

If you experience or have experienced sexual harassment on the DC Metro system: Whether the event is happening at the moment or occurred months ago, we strongly encourage you to report to Metro Transit Police (MTP): www.wmata.com/harassment or (202) 962-2121. Reporting helps identify suspects as well as commons trends in harassment. You can program MTP’s number into your phone so you can easily reach them when needed.

If you need assistance in coping with public sexual harassment or assault, please contact the DC Rape Crisis Center (DCRCC) 24/7 crisis hotline at 202-333-RAPE (202-333-7279).

Getting harassed inside your own apartment? #NopeDC

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Location: 12th Street NW between Mass and M
Time: Daytime (9:30am-3:30pm)

I was in my apartment and taking something out of the oven. A fire truck was outside my apartment building since the fire alarm had been going off for an hour or so. Two firemen had been in the ladder which had been extended to the roof. As I was taking the food out of the oven, I heard, “Show me more, show me more!!” I looked over and a white fireman in the ladder was at my apartment windows level. He had a smirk and was giving me the thumbs up sign. My top was hanging a bit loose over my chest as I was reaching down to the oven and I realized he could see.

When I tried to pull the blinds down he yelled, “No pull it up show me more show me more.” When I finally was able to lower the blinds, he said don’t worry I’ll get a view from below.”

I asked to speak to the captain, who was patronizing and said I’ve known this guy for 30 years, he would never do that. He tried to say he was seeing if there was smoke — they firemen had already been to apartments to check if there was smoke. If he was really concerned, he could have asked, is there a fire in your apartment, is there smoke?

Submitted 5/20/17 by “PN”

Do you have a personal experience with gender-based public sexual harassment or assault? Share your story to help raise awareness about the pervasiveness and harmful effects of street harassment. All submissions are posted anonymously unless otherwise specified.

If you experience or have experienced sexual harassment on the DC Metro system: Whether the event is happening at the moment or occurred months ago, we strongly encourage you to report to Metro Transit Police (MTP): www.wmata.com/harassment or 202-962-2121. Reporting helps identify suspects as well as commons trends in harassment. You can program MTP’s number into your phone so you can easily reach them when needed.

If you need assistance in coping with public sexual harassment or assault, please contact the DC Rape Crisis Center (DCRCC) 24/7 crisis hotline at 202-333-RAPE (202-333-7279).

Love Is…Respect

February is National Teen Dating Violence Awareness and Prevention Month. The month provides a great opportunity to raise awareness about abuse in teen and young adult relationships and promote programs that prevent it – because dating violence is more common than you might think. 

In fact, girls and young women between the ages of 16 and 24 experience the highest rate of intimate partner violence—almost triple the national average—and the rate is even higher for women of color and trans women. These violent relationships have serious consequences for victims, putting them at higher risk for substance abuse, eating disorders, risky sexual behavior, suicide and adult re-victimization.

Want to help spread the word and stop dating violence in our community?

 

Respect Week: February 13th-17th
Go to www.loveisrespect.org/resources/teendvmonth/ to get the National Respect Week toolkit. The DC Coalition Against Domestic Violence also sponsoring Respect Week DC during the week, so check out their toolkit for sample social media posts and actions!

Wear Orange for Love: February 14th
Join us in promoting healthy relationships for all young people this February by wearing orange on February 14, 2017 as part of the annual #Orange4Love campaign!

Real Week: February 20th-24th
It’s time to get real about relationships. The good, the bad and everything in between—it’s time to say what’s really on our minds when it comes to teen dating abuse. For more details, go to www.breakthecycle.org/realweek.

Teens Helping Teens: Empowering Young People to Support Each Other: Feb. 23, 4:30 p.m.
Studies show that teens are more likely to go to their friends for help or support. This webinar, aimed at adult allies (educators, parents, youth organizations), will provide information and strategies for teaching young people about healthy relationships and how to support one another. Register here.

Is your organization hosting any events or activities for National Teen Dating Violence Awareness and Prevention Month? Tell us in the comments or email claire@collectiveactiondc org and we’ll spread the word!

You Deserve to Feel Safe

This month, a new series of anti-harassment PSAs launched on the Metro and Metrobus system. The project is a collaboration between Collective Action for Safe Spaces (CASS), Stop Street Harassment, and the Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority (WMATA).

Now, more than ever, our work to build safe public spaces is critical. Within the past few weeks, we’ve seen a spike in reports of harassment across our city — especially targeting people of color, LGBTQ and gender nonconforming people, and people who are part of multiple marginalized groups. Harassers take advantage of trains and buses as environments where their targets can’t easily escape, making public transit an important space to address the problem.

The new awareness campaign has three goals:

  1. Support people who experience harassment with messages letting riders know they deserve to be treated with respect.
  2. Promote a culture of bystander intervention, where everyone is responsible for speaking out against harassment and making public transit safer.
  3. Elevate our city’s most marginalized identities by featuring the faces of people who are part of marginalized groups, such as trans women of color and Muslim women, who face harassment most severely and most frequently.

In addition to training for WMATA’s frontline staff and supervisors, this anti-harassment campaign helps to create a culture of safety and community accountability.

We have a long way to go to ensuring public spaces are safe for *everyone,* but we remain committed to empowering the DC community to speak out against harassment and create public spaces where everyone feels respected and safe.

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